Atkins Diet Gets A "Makeover"

As I was posting my last blog item -- staying on the topic of "one-size-fits-all" diets -- I received this news about Atkins Nutritionals wanting to do its own kind of "makeover" to spur slumping sales of its product line that supports the late Dr. Robert Atkins' low-carb diet philosophies.

The company has changed its method of determining "net carbs" on its foods by incorporating parts of a glycemic-index diet, a new fad churning in Europe, on revised food labels. The company says this new method for counting carbs "more accurately" determines a patient's blood sugar response to foods and their subsequent weight gain. Additionally, Atkins claims this new labeling is more precise than their previous net carbs subtraction method.

The move was made on the heels of Atkins Nutritionals closing its division in Great Britain and to aggressively take on competitors marketing products with ties to another trendy regimen: The South Beach Diet. (Before you consider this diet I urge you to read my dozen reasons to stay away from it!) But it may be too late for Atkins, as the current number of Americans who follow a low-carb diet has fallen by more than half over the past year!

It's not at all surprising to me that people have given up on the Atkins diet regimen, based on two major problems it doesn't address at all:

  • Dr. Atkins' diet won't do the trick for a diverse population, including a third who need to eat a high-carb diet based on their body's unique nutritional type.
  • As my previous blog noted, the emotional factors behind one's poor eating habits are never addressed, so the best plan in the world won't work if you can't accept the concept that you will be successful. That's why I strongly recommend learning the Emotional Freedom Technique, the proven energy psychology tool I use daily in my practice to address the emotional blocks that can prevent you from living a full and happy life.

Yahoo News March 23, 2005

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