More Proof Fish Oil Can Beat Alzheimer's

Particularly in the past year, conventional medicine has become much more clued into the phenominal health benefits of fish oil, chock full of essential omega-3 fats your body needs to optimize your health. A new study offers clinical proof how foods fortified with docosahexenoic acid (DHA), the omega-3 fatty acid found in several types of coldwater fish, delay the deadly toll of Alzheimer's disease.

Researchers studied the beneficial effects of fish oil by modifying the diets of older mice. One group ate foods fortified with high amounts of DHA while the others were fed a low-DHA diet. Within five months, mice that ate a higher DHA diet had built up 70 percent less of a buildup of amyloid protein in the brain (that makes up the plaque typically found in Alzheimer's patients).

But this isn't the first time this research team had seen the benefits of fish oil. In a study published last fall in the scientific journal Neuron, DHA was responsible for protecting the brains of mice from synaptic damage, enabling them to better perform on memory tests.

Why do omega-3s make such difference to your health? I believe one of the crucial balancing acts on the course to optimal health is getting a better handle on the proper ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 fats in your daily diet. Both types of fatty acids are essential for human health. However, the typical American consumes far too many omega-6 fats and not enough omega-3 fats, like DHA, to be healthy. The ideal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats should be 1:1.

The easiest way to balance your ratio is to consume more omega-3 fats from good sources and to reduce your intake of omega-6 fats (foods containing corn, soy, canola, safflower and sunflower oils are far too common in the typical diet). The best way to do that is to take a high-quality fish or cod liver oil. To learn more about this essential food and all the good it can do for your health, I strongly recommend you review my FAQ page on fish oil that goes into much greater detail and provides links to longer, more extensive research.

Yahoo News March 22, 2005

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