Pasteurized Milk May Increase Male Parkinson's Risk?

Earlier this year I wrote about how all the steps you can take to avoid the 10 most common toxins in the water, food and air we breathe. One of the most important things you can do is to buy and eat as much organic produce, free-range meats and raw dairy products as you can afford.

That's what drew me to this study that found middle-aged men may more than double their risk of succumbing to Parkinson's disease if they drink lots of milk every day (although that same risk isn't true for women) versus those who don't drink it at all.

The study tracked the incidence of Parkinson's disease along with dietary intake in some 7,500 men, ages 45-68, over three decades. During the 30-year period, 128 men had developed Parkinson's, a rather small amount, considering almost 7 cases would be expected among those who didn't drink it. However, among those who drank more than a pint of milk daily, some 15 cases of Parkinson's disease were forecast.

And scientists couldn't identify the possible ingredient that triggers Parkinson's in middle-aged men either, although they claimed it wasn't calcium. I wonder if pasteurization, a destructive process that actually changes the physical structure (denatures) of the fragile proteins in the milk and converts them into foreign proteins that can actually harm your body, could be behind this link.

If you or your family currently drink milk, it is important for you to find authentic raw milk sources. I have seen so many of my patients recover their health with raw milk that I perceive this to be one of the most profoundly healthy foods you can consume. To that end, I strongly recommend you visit the Real Milk Web site to locate a farmer in your area who produces raw milk products.

One of the best ways to protect adults against the onset of symptoms of Parkinson's disease is just as healthy for you: Exercise.

Neurology, March 22, 2005, Vol. 64, Number 6: 1047-1051

Yahoo News April 6, 2005

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