The Myth of "Healthy" Obesity

You may recall a study I posted last month about the horrific toll obesity has had on this nation's health and pocketbooks. Imagine how stunned I was to read a study, featured in today's Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), that found people who are overweight but not obese may have a lower risk of mortality than those who maintain a normal weight.

Some argue these findings are a sanity break from the near-hysterical reaction our society has about avoiding fat, and that the numbers don't support such deep concerns. And one USC professor had the most unbelievable comment of all: The take-home message from this study, it seems to me, is unambiguous. What is officially deemed overweight these days is actually the optimal weight.

Why has obesity become less of a problem? Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control attribute their all-too-rosy outlook to breakthroughs in medications -- specifically toxic statins and hypertension drugs.

No wonder the health care profession is in such dire straits and in desperate need of an overhaul!

This certainly flies in the face of physical evidence, like blood pressure rates that have risen dangerously in this country along with doctors who do the unthinkable and ignore a patient whose health worsens as his waistline expands.

Fact is, regaining the optimal health you were likely born with isn't easy and it takes a lot of effort on your part to make that happen. However, by following the guidelines and doing some research on your own, I strongly feel you'll soon be on your way to achieving total health.

Journal of the American Medical Association, April 20, 2005, Vol. 293, No. 15: 1868-1874

New York Times April 20, 2005 Registration Required

The (Lakeland, Fla.) Ledger April 20, 2005

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