Why Don't the Amish Have Autistic Children?

A United Press International (UPI) reporter went out to search for autistic children in Lancaster County, the heart of Amish country in Pennsylvania. Based on national statistics there should have been as many as 200 children with autism in the community. Instead, he only found three.

One was a young girl who had been brought over from China, adopted by one family only to be given up after becoming overwhelmed by her autism, and then re-adopted by an Amish Mennonite family. The second definitely had received a vaccination and developed autism shortly thereafter. The reporter, however, was unable to determine the vaccination status of the third child.

A quote from the mother of the adopted autistic child speaks volumes: My husband just said last week that so far we've never met a family that lives a healthy lifestyle and does not vaccinate their children that has an autistic child. We haven't come across one yet.

Folks, you don't have to be a medical doctor, hold advanced epidemiology degrees or teach molecular genetics to figure this one out. You don't even need a degree in rocket science. How much more obvious could it be?

Unfortunately, this is just another reminder that the link between autism and vaccines is certainly not new. In fact, many so-called experts have known about these links for more than a decade. Last year, a study I posted found children who received vaccines with thimerosal were 27 times more likely to have autism. Looking at the percentages, that's a 2,700-percent increase in autism in those children who received unnecessary vaccines tainted with mercury.

If you're a young parent weighing the pros and cons of vaccines, I strongly urge you to learn more about the toxicity of thimerosal, the mercury-laced preservative still present in many vaccines.

When will the public wake up?

Washington Times April 18, 2005

Washington Times April 19, 2005

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