Can Day Care Protect Your Kids From Leukemia?

An interesting study published online in the British Medical Journal (see free text link below) touches on a topic I've discussed before that may go far to ensure your kids sidestep the devastating effects of diseases like leukemia as they grow up: Attending daycare and participating with other children in playgroups.

Social activities with other infants and children during the first few months of life may protect against subsequent risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to the study. Researchers collected data on some 6,300 children without cancer, and 3,140 with cancer between ages 2-14. Of those who suffered from cancer, about 1,300 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

As the amount of social activity increased, scientists discovered a child's risk of contracting leukemia fell with it. In fact, kids who attended day care during their first three months on this world of ours reduced their chances by an astonishing 69 percent.

Some experts discounted the study, including a spokesperson for the American Cancer Society, who questioned the real use of such data. Perhaps, it would be important, the physician said, if a specific infection that triggers leukemia could be found. And, besides, why would researchers spend time, money and energy for small gains like this?

The moral of this study is pretty clear to me: Any kind of natural protection from disease is certainly a whole lot better and safer for your children than being forced to take vaccines tainted with mercury that can permanently injure their health.

And there's nothing small about that!

British Medical Journal April 22, 2005 Free Full-Text Article

Jackson (Tenn.) Sun April 25, 2005

Yahoo News April 22, 2005

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