The Vaccine Shortage No Crisis At All

With last year's shortfall still on the minds of the "experts," it appears the supply of vaccines set aside to "cure" the flu and many childhood diseases has taken a sharp dive.

By the numbers:

  • Embattled Chiron expects to produce no more than about 30 million flu vaccines this year, a big difference from a big fat zero last year due to poor manufacturing conditions at its Liverpool, England, facility -- although nobody really needs them -- but a steep drop from previous expectations.
  • Although the feds like to have 41 million vaccines in reserve for childhood diseases, currently that stockpile amounts to less than a third of that.

Of course, you know what happens when there's a shortage of anything: Prices go up and vaccines are no exception. Sanofi-Aventis, the only flu-shot supplier with FDA approval (formerly called Aventis Pasteur), has raised list prices about 17 percent over last year. And, according to a Sanofi-Aventis spokesperson, demand is so strong the company has created a waiting list for doctors wanting to buy their vaccines.

After the last flu season came and went without a calamity (despite much verbal hand-wringing from the experts), caution is replacing grave concern over the shortfall of vaccines, particularly those given to children. In fact, a recent interview with Dr. Donald Miller discussed his user-friendly vaccination schedule for kids, a very popular two-part article I posted late last year.

Fact is, even though the experts don't want to admit it, autism has become an epidemic: One in every 68 American families has an autistic child. Besides, a growing number of people are starting to wake up to the fact that autism -- as a result of exposure to mercury from vaccines -- is incredibly more dangerous than the diseases they're supposed to protect us from!

Townhall.com April 30, 2005

USA Today April 28, 2005

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