Low Cholesterol No Protection From Metabolic Syndrome

Four years ago, I posted a study that found -- in opposition to the norm automatically accepted by conventional medicine -- a low cholesterol score wasn't necessarily the gold standard for picture-perfect health. In fact, low cholesterol is associated with negative behaviors such as aggression and depression as well as stroke.

It took a while, but conventional medicine appears to be wising up. A growing body of evidence is building a strong case for low LDL cholesterol being a marker for metabolic syndrome -- a cluster of symptoms including elevated levels of glucose, triglycerides and C-reactive protein and mild hypertension.

Some endocrinologists are concerned, however, the criteria for metabolic syndrome excludes patients who are insulin-resistant but aren't overweight or demonstrate any other symptoms, like East Indians. So much so, a lot of endocrinologists prefer to refer to metabolic syndrome by a different name: Insulin resistance syndrome. Moreover, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists believes other factors should be taken into account. In fact, most ought to sound very familiar to you:

  • A larger than normal body mass index
  • Poor exercise habits
  • Age, ethnic background and genetic predisposition

Also, not at all surprising to me, according to a recent study, were a number of recommendations to treat metabolic syndrome, none of which involve taking a toxic drug. Here's a few suggestions to reduce your risk of metabolic syndrome significantly:

New York Times May 10, 2005 Registration Required

Wilmington Star-News May 10, 2005

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