How Food Containers, Breast Cancer Are Linked

Last month, I warned you about the dangers of bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used in the production of baby bottles, food-storage containers and the lining of soft drink cans. A new study from Tufts University has linked the use of BPA to the incidence of breast cancer.

Researchers reported persistent alterations to mammary gland development after giving BPA to pregnant mice which were designed to mimic human exposure levels. Mice were treated late in pregnancy and about four days after birth, then examined when they reached puberty a month later. The researchers found large increases in the number and density of terminal end buds, part of the mammary gland structure where breast tumors start in animals and humans.

Additionally, mice tainted with BPA had a reduced ability to get rid of damaged cells that could become cancerous.

These are just the newest side effects of BPA exposure. Among others recently identified: Increased fat formation, early puberty and disrupted reproductive cycles.

The only real way to prevent toxins from collecting in your body in the first place is to avoid any exposure to them. To help you with this process, you'll want to review an article I wrote earlier this year about the top 10 ways to do just that.

The Guardian May 30, 2005

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