Vitamin B6 Treats Colorectal Cancer in Women

An interesting study has tied a high dietary intake of vitamin B6 over time with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer in women, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in this country.

Swedish researchers worked with the Harvard School of Public Health to analyze a study of some 67,000 women, ages 40-75, to evaluate the association between long-term dietary vitamin B6 intake from food sources and colorectal cancer risk.

This newest research mirrors similar findings from another Harvard study that found high daily levels of vitamin B6 could reduce a woman's risk of succumbing to colon cancer by 58 percent.

One strange finding: Women who consume moderate to large amounts of alcohol -- in addition to the right amount of vitamin B6 -- reduce their odds of developing colorectal cancer by more than 70 percent, while low vitamin B6 intake increased it.

The recommended daily dietary intake of vitamin B6 for non-pregnant women in the United States is 1.3-1.5 mg. Vitamin B6 performs a wide variety of functions in the body:

  • Maintaining normal blood glucose levels.
  • Fighting off infections.
  • Creating hemoglobin to ensure that oxygen gets to important organs and tissues.

Some of the best natural sources of vitamin B6: Red bell peppers, garlic, bananas, celery and mushrooms.

EurekAlert June 3, 2005

Gastroenterology February 23, 2005 Free Full-Text Article

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