All the Money in the World Can't Solve Health Problems If Used Unwisely

Bill Gates is the richest man in the world and has the largest foundation. The Gates Foundation decided a few years ago it was time for the world's best scientific minds to tackle the problems that besiege the world's poor. The Gates Foundation created the Grand Challenges in Global Health which provided nearly $1 billion dollars for innovative solutions in health.

I have great respect for Bill's business skills that has allowed him to become the richest person in the history of the world, but he is relatively clueless when it comes to health. It is noble that he is seeking to use his accumulated resources for good. I actually plan to do the same with the Mercola Foundation that was formed last year.

However, if you read the article you will find nearly everyone of the winners of this challenge is using fatally flawed philosophical approaches to address the problems. If someone on the Gates Foundation understood health they could leverage those resources to really make a difference in the health of the poor of this world.

The problem is that Gates has no obvious interest in natural healing techniques and is relying on advisors that are rooted in the fatally flawed conventional medical paradigm that holds vaccines as the cure for all infectious diseases. About the only thing the Gates Foundation is doing that may have some long term impact is their work with malaria. But if they seek to use a vaccine approach to that, it will also fail.

I firmly believe, once a critical threshold of the population strongly shares the natural medicine convictions I share with you daily on my Web site, we will see changes that will shift important institutions like the Gates Foundation and many governments to fund initiatives that will truly change human health at its deepest levels.

On another note, the 11th richest person in the world died yesterday in a foolish experiment.

What is the lesson here?

Even billionaires aren't immune to the law of physics. No matter how much money you have, you still need to exercise common sense.

And that, folks, is the connection between the two stories. High levels of income do not necessarily come with common sense. The older I get, the more clear and obvious it is that common sense is not very common. In fact, it is extraordinarily rare and not related to your income level.

USA Today June 28, 2005

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