Lung Cancer Affects More Female Non-Smokers

Christopher Reeve falls and breaks his neck in his prime and now his 44-year-old non-smoking beautiful widow, Dana, comes down with lung cancer. Life just doesn't seem to be very fair for many...

According to this awesome piece in this morning's USA Today, Dana may be part of a growing group of women who don't smoke and are more likely than their male counterparts to develop lung cancer. Strangely, 20 percent of female non-smokers succumb to lung cancer, or about twice the number of men.

Some risk factors blamed for this greater incidence of lung cancer among non-smoking women: second-hand smoke, radon and genetic mutations.

Overall, some 15,000 non-smoking women die from lung cancer every year. Even worse, the disease is just as deadly today as it was some three decades ago: Some 15 percent survive five years. An interesting study I posted earlier this spring pointed to natural treatments for lung cancer than could improve those survival odds: Sunshine or a higher dosage of vitamin D prior to surgery.

I also urge you to read my recent 11-step checklist for reducing your risk of cancer.

USA Today August 9, 2005

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