Don't Include Lead In Your Kids' Lunchboxes

The Center for Environmental Health recently filed lawsuits in California based on harmful levels of lead they discovered in soft vinyl lunchboxes. Twenty-seven boxes tested with at-home detection kits were found to contain high lead levels. Of that number, 17 lunchboxes sent to an independent lab for extra testing had lead levels exceeding federal safety standards.

In fact, one box manufactured by Targus Int., tested at an astounding 56,400 part per million (ppm), more than 90 times the legal limit for lead in painted children's products. (Among the targets of the lawsuits: Toys R Us, DC Comics and Walgreens.)

According to a researcher with the center, the lead isn't contained in the plastic, but it can rub off on a child's hands and their food. If you're concerned about the safety of your son or daughter's lunchbox, you should be able to find inexpensive hand-held lead testing kits at a nearby hardware store. Or better yet, try reusable cloth or paper bags.

Lead is just one five common metals you'll want to avoid, and a popular piece I posted two years ago will show you how to do just that.

Center For Environmental Health August 31, 2005 Free Full Text Report

Los Angeles Times September 12, 2005 Registration Required

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