Government Corn Subsidies Worsen Your Health

A few months ago, I told you about the inequities surrounding the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recently revised Food Pyramid, thanks to farmers who receive $15 billion to grow corn and soybeans alone. An awesome story in today's New York Times reports on a big problem facing this country's subsidy program. Corn production has far outstripped consumption for another year, reaching nearly 11 billion bushels in 2005.

The conundrum: The government pays subsidies to farmers for growing too much corn and when crop prices are too low (leading some to believe overall subsidies may surpass the record $22.9 billion spent in 2000). Overall, corn producers will receive about $4.5 billion when all is said and done.

Take last year's grain surplus and add soaring gasoline prices, a severe drought and all the damage from two hurricanes hitting the upper Gulf Coast, and you have a recipe for the most expensive harvest ever subsidized by the federal government.

In fact, one Iowa corn producer interviewed had a 60-foot tall mountain of corn (almost 3 million bushels) piled outdoors next to full grain elevators, not knowing what to do with it.

Could Americans be getting wise about reducing the amount of grains they're eating every day?

New York Times November 9, 2005 Registration Required

Tuscaloosa News.com November 9, 2005

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