Getting Chilled May Bring On a Cold

Contrary to conventional opinion, getting cold may indeed be connected to catching one, based on a British study that compared the health of 90 students who planted their bare feet in buckets of cold water, versus an equal number who wore shoes and socks, for 20 minutes.

Within a few days, 13 students reported cold symptoms -- sore throat or a runny nose -- compared to the control group. Interestingly, those who developed a cold during the study also reported more problems with them every year than those who experienced no symptoms at all.

One of the frigid factors that make people more susceptible to colds: Cold feet can cause pronounced constriction of the blood vessels in the nose, making patients who may have been exposed or infected with a virus more prone to infection.

Based on these results, the chances are good you'll be exposed to someone at work or home fighting a cold this winter. That said, there's no need to go into hibernation until next spring. Prevention is the key to lessen your chances safely and naturally and without resorting to over-the-counter drugs.

Here's some proven, effectively ways to do just that:

Family Practice November 14, 2005

Yahoo News November 14, 2005

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