The Wonders of Genetic Research Don't Replace Natural Treatments

My molecular scientists at the University of Southern California have found the SIR2 gene, instead of lengthening the life span of living things, may promote aging.

Rather than adding copies of SIR2 to yeast samples, scientists eliminated it altogether. As a result, the life span of yeast was extended by a factor of six when combined with caloric restriction or a mutation in either the RAS2 or SCH9 genes, or both. Moreover, human cells with reduced SIR2 activity confirm this gene may have a pro-aging effect.

This is what I call a clue. If you can manipulate a gene and increase the longevity of yeast, it is not a big leap to believe we can achieve similar results in humans. I am convinced, in the next few decades, researchers will have developed the tools to manipulate these genes in humans and will likely be able to increase our life span by 50 percent.

That said, gene manipulation will never be a substitute for following the Total Health Program, but it will be a powerful synergistic tool to maximize our potential.

Cell, Vol. 123, No. 4, November 18, 2005: 655-667

University of Southern California November 17, 2005

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