Why Are Mercury Safety Standards So Lax in America?

I guarantee you'll want to read this awesome three-part report by the Chicago Tribune about the perils of eating store-bought fish contaminated by mercury, perhaps a reaction to a study conducted earlier this year by scientists at the University of North Carolina.

Sad to say, the gist of today's report is probably nothing new to many of you who visit my blog every day. The advice regularly dispensed by the FDA and EPA regarding the hazards of eating fish is so misleading and faulty that you may be led to believe you're eating a "safe" amount of fish when, in fact, you're not.

And, even though the FDA acknowledges people may be harmed by eating these mercury-laden fish, environmental regulations governing this toxic metal haven't changed over the past quarter-century. Despite comments to the contrary by David Acheson, the FDA's chief medical officer, one agency scientist confessed today's mercury standard reflects the science of the 1970s.

U.S. standards are so lax -- considered to be among the weakest in the world -- swordfish bought by Tribune reporters at a local supermarket was found to exceed the safe limit for mercury by a factor of three.

Just another reminder, you can get the same nutritional benefits of fish without exposing your body to the risks of mercury by taking a high quality fish or cod liver oil daily.

Chicago Tribune December 12, 2005 Registration Required

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