Smoking, Diabetes Double Your Pancreatic Cancer Risks

Earlier this year, I warned you about one of the most devastating cancers -- pancreatic cancer -- and how diabetes elevates your risks more than eightfold. A new study by the National Cancer Institute found men with high insulin levels who smoke double their chances of developing pancreatic cancer, compared to those with normal glucose levels.

Researchers based their findings on results from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) study that tracked the health of 29,000 male smokers in Finland for 17 years. Over that time, 169 patients developed pancreatic cancer.

Even worse, some patients at the highest risk had abnormal glucose levels more than a decade before pancreatic cancer appeared, according to the lead researcher.

By all measures, deaths blamed on pancreatic cancer are small -- about 32,000 in this country -- but a diagnosis is almost always a fatal one. Fortunately, diabetes is one of the easiest diseases you can treat naturally by modifying your diet based on your body's unique nutritional type, starting an exercise plan and improving your sleep habits.

Quitting smoking is also very crucial in protecting your health. Even if you don't succumb to pancreatic cancer, a recent report found smoking, along with obesity, may already be erasing years off your life.

Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 294, No. 22, December 14, 2005: 2872-2878

Science Blog December 14, 2005

Science Daily December 20, 2005

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