If You Live in the U.S. You Are Paying WAY TOO Much For Your Internet

Yesterday, I told you about a new book that takes a hard look at all the promises made by the Baby Bells who were paid through our tax dollars to create a high-speed internet infrastructure throughout America that never happened.

This follow-up piece (free text link below) looks at the other side of the problem, and one that affects Americans directly: U.S. residents and businesses pay two to three times as much for slower and poorer quality service than countries like South Korea and Japan. Since 2001, according to the International Telecommunications Union, the United States has fallen from fourth to 16th in the world in broadband penetration.

What passes for broadband in the United States is "the slowest, most expensive and least reliable in the developed world." While about 60 percent of U.S. households do not subscribe to broadband -- because it is either unavailable where they live or they cannot afford it -- most Japanese citizens can access a high-speed connection that's more than 10 times faster than what's available here for just $22 a month.

In fact, Japan is now rolling out ultra-high speed access at more than 500 times what the FCC considers to be "broadband" in this country.

By now, you've probably figured out America has become a follower -- not a leader -- in the broadband economy ahead, and the economic ramifications are profound.

Digital Communities

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