Switch to voip phone service to protect your privacy

Ever so slowly, Americans are losing more of their freedoms, all under the guise of terrorism protection. That's the essence of the lead story in this morning's USA Today, as the National Security Agency (NSA) has been collecting phone records of millions of Americans since 9/11, with the help of Verizon, BellSouth and AT&T, the overwhelming majority of whom are doing nothing wrong.

Isn't that just like the government to introduce a problem, generate a reaction --- fear -- and then come up with a solution that takes away our freedom in exchange for their protection from the perceived threat... Does the bird flu hoax ring a bell?

Believe me, I am no major fan of AT&T either and their reemergence after their breakup many years ago is not a reassuring sign. This reassembling of the "Baby Bells" is one of the reasons you'll want to seriously consider voice-over-Internet protocol (VoIP) service. Not only is VoIP less expensive, it should reduce the government's ability to do this type of tracking.

More than 2.5 million Americans have made the switch to VoIP and I became a convert almost four years ago.

No surprise, the USA Today report spread like wildfire through Capitol Hill, as legislators reacted angrily to more details coming out about the Bush administration's eavesdropping and data-mining programs. One Massachusetts Congressman summed it up best when he called the news, another telecom merger between the NSA and AT&T.

If you want to express your outrage at this major loss of personal privacy you can let your congressman know about it. The Electronic Frontier Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving your privacy. You can contact your congressman through a form they set up and let them know you don't want them to rubberstamp these wiretaps.

USA Today May 11, 2006

CNET News.com May 11, 2006

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