How Prozac Works in Your Brain

You know how Prozac, along with the rest of the class of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), works to harm your health and immune system. Scientists have identified how Prozac works in your brain.

What's already known is how Prozac "relieves" depression by stimulating the growth of new brain cells in a region of the brain known as the dentate gyrus. Researchers tracked their origin by analyzing the production of proteins in the brains of adult mice that, combined with Prozac, allows immature stem cells to be converted into mature neurons.

Prozac has an effect in the second phase of development, kick-starting the production of amplifying neural progenitors (ANPs), an intermediate form of immature stem cells that eventually become mature neurons.

Wisely, scientists are testing other drugs, including more SSRIs, to determine if others may have the same effect, or could be more potent.

Just a reminder, there are many natural methods at your disposal for treating depression without an antidepressant, like exercise and energy psychology tools like the Emotional Freedom Technique.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 103, No. 21, May 23, 2006: 8233-8238 Free Full Text Article

BBC News May 26, 2006

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