Are Invisible Mold, Spores in Your Home? They Could Increase Your Risk of Multiple Allergies

With humidity readings climbing along with the temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere, the mold season has arrived and that could be especially bad news for very young children, according to a University of Cincinnati study.

Babies exposed to basidiospores and other airborne fungal spores -- specifically penicillium/aspergillus and alternaria -- early on were more prone to develop allergies to some foods, pet dander, pollen, mold and dust mites. (Researchers based their findings on air samples taken from the homes of some 150 infants for two days.)

If one of those species sounds vaguely familiar, you're probably remembering the warning I posted late last year about Aspergillus fumigatus, the most common species of fungus found in pillows. Nevertheless, buying high quality water-, spore- and mold-proof pillow covers you wash regularly only partially take care of the problem.

The most effective solution to reduce your child's exposure to allergens and mold at home -- and your exposure as well -- is to use the best air purifier available. I have researched and analyzed this extensively and, out of all the units out there, here's the one I recommend and offer in the Mercola.com store: The Way Healthier Air Purifier that effectively rids your home of odors, germs and fungi naturally.

University of Cincinnati June 14, 2006

Pediatric Allergy and Immunology June 14, 2006

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