Pesticides Elevate Parkinson's Risks in Males

One of the 10 most common toxins you need to avoid -- pesticides -- has been linked to, among other things, Parkinson's disease. A new Mayo Clinic study has found a new wrinkle among those risks of pesticide exposure: Men are harmed far more often than women.

Scientists looked in their own backyard (Olmsted County, Minn.) to located patients near them who had developed Parkinson's between 1976-95 (149), then compared them to 129 control patients who didn't have the disease.

Male Parkinson's patients were more than twice as likely to have been exposed to pesticides at some point in their lives. Conversely, female Parkinson's patients had a much lower frequency of pesticide exposure than males did (researchers theorize estrogen may offer women some protection). And, scientists found no additional links to other household or industrial chemicals.

By the way, if you think living in an urban area far away from gardens or farms safeguards you from any risks, forget it: Based on a report I posted two years ago, the average person carries around at least 13 harmful pesticides in their bodies, if not more. Aside from avoiding pesticides, some other simple tips you can do to reduce your exposure to pesticides:

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