Take a Drug to ''Beat'' Breast Cancer, Suffer a Fatal Stroke

It's evil and dangerous to play with the lives of the sick by throwing drugs that "cure" one problem, only to leave them vulnerable to many more, but it happens all the time. Such is the case with the osteoporosis drug Evista (raloxifene), once actually promoted for treating cardiovascular disease.

The Eli Lilly drug was found to prevent breast cancer in a study of more than 10,000 postmenopausal women published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, but at the dire expense of trading those odds for an elevated risk of fatal strokes and blood clots.

The incidence of breast cancer among patients who took Evista for five years dropped by a third over the course of the study. The number of deaths among Evista patients that were attributed to fatal strokes, however, was nearly 50 percent higher than for those who took a placebo.

Of course, the coffers of drugmakers would empty very quickly if more patients understood they could virtually eliminate their cancer risks safely and effectively by making some major lifestyle changes that include eating the foods your body burns best based on your unique nutritional type.

New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 355, No. 2, July 13, 2006: 125-137 Free Full Text Study

Yahoo News July 12, 2006

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