The GM Grass Growing on The Golf Course Could Spread to Your Lawn

One could argue the USDA could be finally getting the message about the blight of genetically modified crops. Apparently, creeping bentgrass -- a genetically modified grass made to resist Monsanto's popular herbicide Roundup and marketed for use on golf courses -- has the agency worried enough to conduct its first environmental assessment on a GM plant.

So far, EPA labs in Corvallis, Ore., have identified nine samples of GM creeping bentgrass, out of more than 20,000 varieties of grass, within a 2.3-mile radius of their facility.

The major concern for all of us: Bentgrass mixing with many non-GM plants can create hybrids that could make them immune to herbicides or do something else completely unpredictable. And, by the way, 70 percent of the America's commercial grass seed is grown in Oregon too.

The only good that could come from this disaster, besides a benign impact on our environment: It could wake up people to the real harm GM foods can do to their bodies.

New York Times August 16, 2006 Registration Required

Check Biotech.org August 16, 2006

New Scientist August 9, 2006

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment