Is One Deadly Kind of Weight Loss Surgery ''Better'' Than Another?

As the obesity epidemic has exploded, so have the cases of bariatric surgery,nearly tripling over a three-year span to 171,000 in 2005. Morecommonly than not, unfortunately, the "bright lights" of conventionalmedicine have recommended the gastric bypass procedure far more oftenthan others like the duodenal switch (less than 8 percent of allweight-loss surgeries nationwide).

A recent study by the University of Chicago found that for the super-obese -- the fastest growing patient group among the obese with BMIs over 50-- the more drastic duodenal switch (altering the intestines to furtherlimit the absorption of fats and starches) may be a better option thangastric bypass.

If you judge the results on weight loss and nothing else, theduodenal switch is more effective. But what about the complications?That factoid received scant attention. One patient opting for theduodenal switch procedure died within 30 days after the operation.

For too long, the so-called experts claimed the mortality rate amongpatients after their bariatric procedures had been nearly nonexistent,a myth blown away by a Journal of the American Medical Associationstudy I posted here nearly a year ago.

Unfortunately, patients often forget it didn't take them a day togain their weight, meaning that it's going to take some time for themto lose it safely, and without surgery. Fortunately, you have all sortsof free tools available on my Web site to take ownership of your healthtoday. A good place to start: Take my free test to discover what foodsyour body burns best according to your unique nutritional type.

Annals of Surgery, Vol. 244, No. 4, October 2006: 611-619

EurekAlert September 22, 2006









Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment