Can Anything Be Done to Improve the FDA?

This interesting commentary explains in greater detail the reasons behind the scathing report issued by the Institute of Medicine, a seen by two health professionals who served on the IOM committee.

An interesting factoid, among many, that explains, in part, the surprising sense of entitlement from by the drug company "cartel" when it comes to drug safety: The Prescription Drug User Fee Act of 1992 certainly accelerated approvals for new drugs, yet prohibited the FDA from applying any of these fees to improve post-marketing "drug surveillance."

Even though that prohibition was lifted four years ago, it was restricted to "selected drug safety activities," the authors said, often contributing to the public perception FDA serves the mega-drug companies at the expense of the American public for whom they are supposed to protect. And, at times, very grudgingly at that...

To say I'm very doubtful anything can really be done to reform the FDA -- even tearing it apart and starting over from scratch -- would be a gross understatement. Besides, the FDA, as it's currently constructed, is far too addicted to the users fees it receives from the mega-drug cartel to make a clean break.

That's why I urge you so often not to waste your time and money on a health care paradigm designed to empty your bank account and slowly take away your health, and begin to take personal responsibility today. The best way to get started right now: Spend a few minutes taking my free nutritional typing mini-course to learn what healthy foods your body burns best.

New England Journal of Medicine October 9, 2006 Free Full PDF Article