Depression Leads to Osteoporosis, But Not Antidepressants!

I'm very concerned an alarming study issued earlier this week regarding the connection between osteoporosis and depression may give conventional medicine just one more ridiculous excuse to prescribe a useless and dangerous antidepressant.

Four weeks after scientists induced mice into a depression-like condition, these animals suffered a tremendous amount of bone loss, especially in their hips and vertebrae, thanks to an impairment of the bone renewal process caused by a drop in bone-building cells (osteoblasts).

Unfortunately, the presence of depression signals the activation of the sympathetic nervous system and, eventually, the secretion of noradrenaline that impairs bone growth. Treatment with an antidepressant, however, blocks the noradrenaline in bones.

That said, why would anyone ever prescribe a potentially fatal antidepressant that could also harm your bones and immune system when gentler, safer solutions like a regular exercise plan will do wonders for osteopororis and depression.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences October 30, 2006

EurekAlert October 30, 2006