Predictable Reactions to Tougher UK Junk Food Ad Bans on TV

The reaction to the decision by Ofcom (the British equivalent of America's FCC) to ban junk food ads from TV programs watched by kids under age 16 and aired in the UK in hopes of curbing the epidemic of childhood obesity has been swift and rather predictable.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) called the new regulations "far superior" to American rules devised by the Federal Trade Commission that support a failed self-regulatory system, and pointed out there's no reason food companies in America couldn't compete under tougher broadcasting regulations like those in the UK.

On the other hand, England's Food and Drink Federation blasted the new rules, claiming they're based on a "scientifically flawed nutrient modeling profile," and that TV is only one of many variables that contribute to the obesity epidemic.

It's true, TV is only one of a handful of problems that contribute to childhood obesity. Considering the average American child is exposed to some 40,000 TV ads annually, and most are for fast-food restaurant chains and sweetened breakfast cereals, you'd be wise not to underestimate the power of the "glow box" on your child's health, or your own.

Before assuming you can't be fooled by what you're seeing on TV, watch this mind-blowing video first, then decide...

Nutra Ingredients USA.com February 26, 2007