Is Organic Good Enough?

For their good health, consumers are slowly beginning to appreciate the value of foods grown locally or close by, rather than buying "organic" foods that are most likely a ripoff at their corner grocery store.

This movement is growing so fast, even Google, one of my favorite companies in the world, has opened a cafeteria, Cafe 150, whose goal is to only use foods and ingredients grown within 150 miles.

This interesting Time feature discusses Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs that offer "phenomenally fresh" fruits and vegetables at very affordable prices. Very smartly, it also addresses concerns about the quality of the organic foods grown by farmers, particularly those who avoid harmful synthetic pesticides and fertilizers but can't afford to pay for the organic certification process required by the government.

That said, not all the foods provided by CSAs are organic, as some farmers may still rely on some chemical sprays or pastured hens that may eat conventionally grown grains. Nevertheless, the author of this Time piece who met the family who farms the whole foods he eats is satisfied with its safety, something most of you can't say about a lot of foods you'll find at the grocery store.

If you've been looking for local grown foods and haven't found them, review the offerings at a variety of organizations, including Local Harvest.

Time Magazine March 2, 2007