Why Are BANNED Food Additives Permitted in Children's Drugs?

Here's one more reason why you should be worried about the useless and, often, toxic drugs your children may be taking: They may be exposed to a "cocktail" of banned food additives, according to a UK survey.

All but one medicine out of 41 given to kids under age 3 contained an additive that had been banned from foods, even though UK laws prohibit artificial colors, sweeteners and most preservatives from foods and drinks marketed to that specific age group.

Among the additives found in these drugs:

  • Synthetic azo dyes
  • Maltitol and sorbitol
  • Benzoate and sulphite preservatives
  • Chloroform

The justification for using these toxic compounds is about what you'd typically expect from an over-the-counter pharmaceutical trade group: Unlike foods, additives in medicines are in very small quantities and are only taken for a short time. Feel any better?

It's important to question what your doctor or any other health professional may prescribe for your child, no matter what side of the counter it comes from, as drugs can certainly be harmful, if not toxic to their health.

The Food Commission March 10, 2007

The Food Commission March 10, 2007

BBC News March 10, 2007