Making Fire With Processed Foods...

Along the same lines as my previous blog about the "mystery" of popping popcorn, I was drawn to this nifty experiment based on my vast interest in science that reminded me of my days as a Boy Scout. The trick involves making a fire with an aluminum soft drink can and a chocolate bar. Sounds difficult, doesn't it? Really, not so much...

Simply, it involves flipping a soft drink can on its bottom and using an abrasive substance to polish its dull surface. For the experiment linked at the bottom of this entry, the instructor used a Toblerone chocolate bar to polish the can (although a purer piece of chocolate is preferable, anyone will do) with a wrapper or cloth. And toothpaste can do the trick nicely too.

The other ingredients are a piece of tinder and bright sunlight. What was so surprising to me: This trick obviously worked even in the winter with snow still on the ground.

If this hasn't occurred to you yet, think about this: If the combination of chocolate and an aluminum can is capable of creating a fire -- albeit with a bit of work -- should it surprise you at all such substances can present a hazard to your health just by consuming them?

For one, aluminum has been widely associated with Alzheimer's disease. Your main sources of exposure are likely through drinking water and antiperspirants. What's inside the can certainly isn't any better. The typical can of soda has about 10 teaspoons of sugar, 150 calories, 30 to 55 mg of caffeine, and is loaded with artificial food colors and sulphites. I can't think of a good reason to ever have one.

And when weighing the pros and cons of eating chocolate, you can safely assume all milk and white chocolate -- including most all candies sold in grocery stores -- has no beneficial antioxidant content.

So, if you think about it, perhaps using a soft drink can and chocolate bar to set a fire is about all those things are good for at all...

Tracker Trail.com

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