Omega-3's Show Heart Benefits for Non-Fish Eaters

Increased intakes of omega-3 fats may decrease the risk of heart disease and heart attack in people with low fish intakes.

Daily intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) of about 240 milligrams was associated with a 50 percent reduction in the risk of coronary heart disease.

Furthermore, the highest average intake of DHA and EPA was associated with a 38 percent reduction in the heart attack, according to a study that examined over 21,000 people with low fish intakes.

Omega-3 fats, most notably DHA and EPA, have been linked to a wide-range of health benefits, including reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and certain cancers, good development of a baby during pregnancy, joint health, and improved behavior and mood.

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