'Satisfying' Labels Beat 'Diet' Labels in Curbing Consumption

Manipulating preconceptions on how filling food will be might offer an interesting avenue in weight control, according to new findings.

Test subjects were more satisfied for longer periods of time after consuming food they were led to believe had larger portion sizes than it actually did.  Memories about how satisfying previous meals were also played a causal role in determining how long those meals staved off hunger. Such data may have implications for food manufacturers, particularly from a labeling aspect.

According to Food Navigator:

“Labels on ‘light’ and ‘diet’ foods might lead us to think we will not be satisfied by such foods, possibly leading us to eat more afterwards ... One way to militate against this, and indeed accentuate potential satiety effects, might be to emphasize the satiating properties of a food using labels such as ‘satisfying’ or ‘hunger relieving’.”

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