Why the Media is Usually Wrong About Health Information

What if wrong answers in medical research aren't an exception, but actually the rule? Many scholars who scrutinize health research are saying that it isn't just an occasional individual study that has flaws, but the entire framework of medical research itself.

Over and over, major pillars of conventional medicine are toppled when the research is further examined. Recently, a major study found that there's no evidence that statins drugs help people with no history of heart disease. And even a brief glance at medical journals shows that prominent studies continually fall by the wayside. For example, numerous studies concluding that popular antidepressants work by altering your brain chemistry have now been disproved -- when the drugs work at all, it is due to the placebo effect.

According to Newsweek:

"Of course, not all conventional health wisdom is wrong. Smoking kills, being morbidly obese or severely underweight makes you more likely to die before your time, processed meat raises the risk of some cancers, and controlling blood pressure reduces the risk of stroke. The upshot for consumers: medical wisdom that has stood the test of time -- and large, randomized, controlled trials -- is more likely to be right than the latest news flash about a single food or drug."

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