A Growing Debate: How to Define Organic Food

Not long ago, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that it will allow American farmers to plant genetically engineered alfalfa.  This decision has reopened some old arguments about what's most important in the label "organic."

Organic farmers aren't allowed to plant GMO seeds. But engineered genes often migrate into organic fields via windblown pollen.  Most organic corn in the U.S. typically contains anywhere from half a percent to 2 percent GMOs.  In the past few years, anti-biotech activists have been calling on organic businesses to fight back more fiercely against GMO contamination.

NPR reports:

“... [I]f you insist on organic milk and eggs from animals that eat absolutely no GMO genes, you'll have to get that food from Europe ... 77 percent of organics consumers said they would stop buying organic food if it contained GMOs.”

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