Asthma Drugs Double Heart Attack Risk

Physicians who prescribe the regular use of beta-agonist drugs for asthma could be endangering their patients, according to two new studies. One concludes that patients could both develop a tolerance for beta-agonists and be at increased risk for asthma attacks, compared with those who do not use the drug at all. The second study shows that beta-agonist use increases cardiac risks, such as heart attacks, by more than two-fold, compared with the use of a placebo. Furthermore, the researchers say that their analyses lead them to suspect a conflict of interest among scientists who are supported by pharmaceutical companies that make beta-agonists, among the world's most widely used drugs. This conflict, they say, could be putting 16 million U.S. asthma sufferers in harm's way. With respect to asthma, simple changes can produce very profound improvements in your ability to breathe, as I discuss in this past article.

Chest June 2004;125(6):2309-21

Annals of Internal Medicine May 18, 2004;140(10):802-13

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment