Attending Preschool Strengthens Childhood Immunity

I've explained many, many times on my site why vaccines are completely unneccessary. Here's another reason why: Children who attend day care or nursery school for at least one year before going to kindergarten are about 36 percent less likely than those not in preschool to develop Hodgkin's lymphoma as young adults, according to a recent report.

Earlier research insisted that higher childhood socioeconomic status and delayed infection with the prevalent Epstein-Barr virus were important predictors of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adulthood. Because attending nursery school or day care favors earlier exposure to common childhood infections, the study supports the hypothesis that delayed infection increases the risk of young-adult Hodgkin's lymphoma, but fails to uphold the link to socioeconomic factors.

Research also shows Hodgkin's lymphoma among adults aged 55 and over is associated with lower socioeconomic status, but not preschool attendance, indicating the existence of a separate mechanism for the development of Hodgkin's lymphoma in the two age groups.

Years of epidemiological evidence have linked the risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma among young adults to high maternal education, few siblings, low housing density and other aspects of higher childhood socioeconomic status, scientists said. It had been believed these characteristics postpone childhood exposure to common pathogens, including the usually harmless Epstein-Barr virus, which can cause infectious mononucleosis when the infection is delayed until adolescence.

Infectious mononucleosis is a demonstrated risk factor for Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, scientists found no association between any of these factors and Hodgkin's lymphoma risk.

Science Blog August 6, 2004

Click Here and be the first to comment on this article
Post your comment