Doctors Finally Recognize They Need to Hold Off on MS Drugs

Perhaps, doctors who practice coventional medicine are beginning to get the message that prescribing potentially lethal drugs merely serve as a temporary solution to ward off a long-term problem. Mayo Clinic researchers found a wait-and-see approach to prescribing medications for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, based on their level of disability, was more beneficial than potentially "drugging" the disease, and possibly the patient, completely away.

Researchers found the longer the duration of MS and the lower the disability, the more likely a patient is to remain stable and not progress to a greater level of disability.

Moses Rodriguez, M.D., Mayo Clinic neurologist and senior author of the paper, adds, "The documentation of benign MS does exist, and this condition can be identified during an analysis of the patient at even five years with MS."

As a result, investigators proposed a definition of benign MS as patients who have the disease for 10 years or more who have an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of 2 or less, because they have less than 10 percent likelihood of developing significant disability in the future. The EDSS quantifies the amount of disability in MS patients from zero (normal neurological exam) to 10 (death due to MS). On this scale, a score of 2 indicates minimal disability, 4 indicates moderate disability but able to walk unassisted, 6 indicates requirement of an aid or cane to walk, and 8 indicates need for a wheelchair.

Patients who have benign MS can have ongoing attacks, but they do not accrue any disability from the attacks, scientists said. In other words, people have symptoms, but they go away, and if they come back, they go away again, typically after a week or so. You might have a bad week or an attack--like the loss of vision in one eye-but you completely recover. Most of the time, however, there would be no outward sign of the disease, and the patients themselves would say that they are normal.

Drs. Pittock, Rodriguez and colleagues found that only 7 percent of patients who had minimal or no disability (EDSS score equal to or less than 2) after 10 years with MS progressed to a greater level of disability (EDSS score greater than 4), and none needed a wheelchair after 20 years with MS. However, for those MS patients studied who had an EDSS score of 2.5 to 4 after 10 years of the disease, 12 of 21 patients' disabilities increased to a score greater than 4 after 20 years with the disease.

To read about the flip side of this approach which can often harm and even kill you, you'll want to review Dr. Russell Blaylock's excellent piece on interferons, a drug often prescribed to MS patients and a wide range of cancer patients that can ruin brain functioning.

So what healthy steps can you take if you're an MS patient?

  • Normalizing vitamin D levels are very important. Make sure anyone you know who has MS reads my article on optimizing vitamin D levels between 45 and 50. The absolute best way to do that is by regular sensible sun exposure. When that is simply not possible then cod liver oil should be used as the animal based omega 3 is absolutely critical for optimizing normal brain function. The absolute best way to do that is by regular sensible sun exposure. When that is simply not possible, cod liver oil should be used as the animal-based omega-3 fat which is absolutely critical for optimizing normal brain function.
  • Following a diet based on your individual nutritional type is also essential because, if one does not have the proper body pH, many critical enzyme systems will not function properly.
  • Nearly all those with automimmune diseases like MS have a significantly unresolved emotional issue that needs to be addressed. Because I've found energy psychology techniques to be the best, tools like EFT provide a powerful means with which to point you in the right direction.

EurekAlert August 30, 2004

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