Raw Food Hitting the Mainstream

USA Today has focused a lot of attention to the array of diets people try and, 99 times out of 100, fail miserably to maintain. Today's issue featured an interesting twist on a different diet, based entirely on preparation. The menu of In The Raw, a Woodstock, N.Y., restaurant, isn't a whole lot different from most eateries, with one major difference: Like its name, everything is served raw.

Some see In The Raw, an organic vegetarian deli and juice bar, as another outpost marking the mainstreaming of raw food diets.

So-called raw foodists can make vegetarians look like slackers. Devoted followers are vegans, meaning they eschew animal and dairy products. Just as importantly, they believe that heating food above the 110-115 degree range destroys enzymes in food and diminishes nutritional value. Healthy food is "living food," they say, organic, unprocessed and uncooked.

Eating raw food is nothing new. In fact, it's basically humanity's oldest cuisine. But interest in raw food diets has been sprouting recently beyond the usual fad cradles like Manhattan and southern California.

Much of this article deals with eating raw food in relation to being a vegan, and, if you've read this Web site regularly at all, you know I believe in the high nutritional value of raw eggs and raw milk.

Nevertheless, I am strongly opposed to the absolute exclusion of all animal foods and believe we all need some. The only issue is how much and that can be easily determined by figuring out your nutritional type. Take our free test so you can start eating and feeling better today.

USA Today August 30, 2004

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