Sunlight Makes The Pain Go Away

In another sign conventional medicine may indeed be catching up to alternative treatments that are far less toxic and actually helpful, increasing the sunlight in a patient's hospital room lessens the need for painkillers and the way one perceives pain, according to new research.

After their surgeries, 89 hospital patients were randomly assigned rooms that were dim or sunny. According to measurements taken by a light meter, patients in darker rooms received almost half as much sunlight than those staying in sunnier rooms.

Not surprisingly, patients in dimmer rooms needed more painkillers -- an additional 28 percent per hour -- while hospitals spent 21 percent less on average for such drugs for those staying in brighter rooms. Moreover, patients placed in brighter rooms after surgery had significantly lower stress scores and marginally lower pain scores when they left the hospital than those staying in darker rooms.

Studies like this one remind me just how ignorant conventional medicine can be. Take, for example, the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). In the late 1800s and early 1900s, long before the development of antibiotics, TB was successfully treated by exposing patients to simple sunlight in a solarium.

And, with the end of winter about a month away, you'll soon be able to get all the sunshine you'll need to optimize your health. The trick, however, is to be careful to never get burnt. The safe, healthy way is to avoid using toxic sunscreens, as they will block absorbing beneficial UV rays.

Sunlight can also do a world of good for other conditions too:

ABC News February 16, 2005

Psychosomatic Medicine January/February 2005, Volume 67, Issue 1,156-163

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