Carbohydrate Quantity Affects Cataract Formation

You may recall a study I posted recently from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition about the terrible effect the high intake of the so-called "good-for-you" polyunsaturated fats can have on your eyesight. A follow up study has discovered polyunsaturated fats may be only part of the problem.

Seems early cortical cataracts -- the second most common kind that occur in the cortex of the lens of the eye -- are spurred by the quantity of carbohydrates you eat, not the quality. Of the 417 female patients who participated in the study, those who ate the most carbs were almost 2.5 times more likely to suffer from cortical cataracts. And high carb intake wasn't associated with nuclear cataracts (the most common kind of cataract) either.

During the course of the study (in which the average patient was about age 60 and had a body mass index of 24), scientists found the daily intake of more than 200 grams of carbohydrates about doubled a woman's chances of cortical cataracts.

However, this connection flies in the face of a recent study I posted that found the kind of carbohydrates you eat -- not the amount -- determine your risk of obesity. All carbs aren't created equally, just one more reason the low-carb Atkins Diet doesn't work.

In fact, a third of Americans require a high-carb diet based on their body's unique nutritional type.

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 81, No. 6, June 2005: 1411-1416

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