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How Much Water Do You Really Need to Drink?

Dehydration is a serious issue throughout the year, but is of particular concern in the summer months. The Washington Post covered this important topic in its primer on dehydration.

Drinking pure water as your primary beverage is undoubtedly one of the most important cornerstones of health, but you do not need to guzzle liters of water each day to stay healthy. In fact, a report from The National Academy of Sciences concluded that most Americans are not walking around dehydrated on a regular basis. They noted, “The vast majority of healthy people adequately meet their daily hydration needs by letting thirst be their guide.”

The report added that while 80 percent of Americans’ total water intake comes from water and other beverages (including caffeinated beverages like coffee, which do “count” in your total fluid intake, contrary to popular belief), 20 percent comes from the food you eat.

Filtering your household water is no longer optional. Water pollution is a significant problem. Your drinking water may be contaminated with gender-bending pharmaceutical drugs, agricultural runoff, industrial waste, and heavy metals released by deteriorating infrastructure. There is also the issue of the toxic chemicals used during water treatment.

The obvious solution is to filter all the water that comes into the house, and then filtering it again at the kitchen sink and shower.  An even more healthful solution is to consume living water.  Energized water can recharge your mitochondria, and deep springs are one excellent source. You can also promote structured water through vortexing or cooling it to 39 degrees Fahrenheit. Reverting tap water back into a vitality boosting element can provide enormous health benefits.
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