Red Wine Compound May Play a Role in Lung Cancer Prevention

Written by Dr. Joseph Mercola

Another study demonstrating possible cancer prevention properties in resveratrol, a compound in grapes, has found that the compound might be useful in preventing lung cancer. The study was done with mice, and the resveratrol was delivered nasally, as opposed to orally, but the scientists were hopeful they can come up with a formula for humans, earth.com said. The nasal delivery helps the compound reach the lungs, researchers explained.

Many studies have shown the healing properties of resveratrol, a powerful antioxidant found in dark-colored berries, red wine, dark chocolate and the skin of red grapes. Besides possible anticancer benefits, this compound has been found to improve blood vessels in people with Type 2 diabetes, and that it may have neuroprotective effects that can lower your Alzheimer’s and dementia risks, as well as optimize cholesterol and decrease inflammation.

Resveratrol works by relaxing the stiffness that occurs with atherosclerosis, known as hardening of the arteries — a serious health concern because this condition can increase your stroke and heart attacks. It also can improve your mitochondrial health.

But, that said, just because resveratrol has good qualities is not a reason to overimbibe in wine or eat a bunch of chocolate. For one thing, if you think red wine is your resveratrol source, think again: First, with no other factors attached, alcohol is neurotoxic and can damage your brain and other organs. It also increases your insulin levels. Wine has even been shown to contain glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup herbicide.

Therefore, the best way to get your resveratrol is by eating whole, organic foods such as blueberries, raspberries or muscadine grapes, which have the highest concentration in nature due to their extra thick skins and many seeds. And, while dark chocolate and cacao are included on the list as sources of resveratrol, keep in mind that your best bet is raw cacao nibs, which can be eaten whole or ground into powder for use in recipes — and those, too, should be eaten in moderation.

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